Philippine Passport 101 – How to apply for a passport

By Yahoo! Philippines | News – Sat, 14 Sep 2013

Whether you’re going out of the country to work, study or just see the world, you will need a passport. This official document is proof that you are a Filipino citizen traveling under the protection of the Philippine government to and from foreign countries.

Philippine passports are issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA). In Metro Manila, applicants should set an appointment when applying for a passport at the DFA main and satellite offices while those in provinces may apply through the nearest regional consular office.

What do you need to do to get a passport? For first-time applicants, we’ve put up a basic guide from information on the DFA website. For the location map of all DFA passport processing offices in Metro Manila you may go to this link: http://emcph.net/getting-passport-made-easy-while-shopping/

Hamsa, 22, a Filipino worker who returned home from Syria shows her passportupon arrival at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport via a chartered flight, in southern Manila, Philippines, 11 September

Show up at the DFA office.

For Metro Manila applicants, this means you need to set an appointment online anytime or via hotline (02) 737-1000 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday. For those in provinces, meanwhile, regional consular offices usually accept walk-in applicants. A list of DFA locations is available on its website.

 

Prepare the following documents, including photocopies:

– duly accomplished application form (download from the DFA website)
– birth certificate issued by the National Statistics Office (NSO) or certified true copy of the birth certificate from the local civil registrar authenticated by the NSO
– Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity

 

List of acceptable IDs:

– government-issued IDs (such as SSS ID, driver’s license, PRC ID, etc.)
– old college ID
– alumni ID
– old employment IDs

 

List of supporting documents (at least three):

– voter’s ID
– NSO marriage contract
– seaman’s book
– transcript of records
– NBI/police/barangay clearance
– income tax return
– community tax certificate
– school yearbook

 

Be ready to pay the fees.

If you’re willing to wait for 15 days, you may opt to pay only the regular processing fee of P950. However, for P1,200 you may get your passport within only seven days via the express processing scheme. The same fees apply for those applying for passport renewal, but if you lost your passport, additional fees will be collected.

 

There are additional requirements in some special cases.

Married women, for example, should bring a copy of their marriage contract. Minor applicants, meanwhile, should be accompanied by a parent during the passport application process. Go to the DFA website. for more details.

 

Strike a pose!

No need to bring a passport-size photo. Under the new DFA passport processing system, your photo will be taken during your personal appearance and will be digitally printed into your passport. There are some rules on photos. You should:

– look directly at the camera lens so that your full face with ears shows
– keep both eyes open (and not covered by hair) and mouth closed
– not wear eyeglasses, contact lenses, earrings or hair accessories
– keep a “neutral” facial expression; not show teeth or gums when smiling (Think Mona Lisa!)

 

Wait.

Again, if you’ve paid for regular processing, your passport will be ready in 15 days. A shorter wait of seven days meanwhile applies for express processing. By default, passports are claimed at the DFA office, but you may opt to have your passport delivered through accredited couriers. But you have to be very careful and remember never to deal with fixers!

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