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Philippine Passport 101 – How to apply for a passport

By Yahoo! Philippines | News – Sat, 14 Sep 2013

Whether you’re going out of the country to work, study or just see the world, you will need a passport. This official document is proof that you are a Filipino citizen traveling under the protection of the Philippine government to and from foreign countries.

Philippine passports are issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA). In Metro Manila, applicants should set an appointment when applying for a passport at the DFA main and satellite offices while those in provinces may apply through the nearest regional consular office.

What do you need to do to get a passport? For first-time applicants, we’ve put up a basic guide from information on the DFA website. For the location map of all DFA passport processing offices in Metro Manila you may go to this link: http://emcph.net/getting-passport-made-easy-while-shopping/

Hamsa, 22, a Filipino worker who returned home from Syria shows her passportupon arrival at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport via a chartered flight, in southern Manila, Philippines, 11 September

Show up at the DFA office.

For Metro Manila applicants, this means you need to set an appointment online anytime or via hotline (02) 737-1000 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday. For those in provinces, meanwhile, regional consular offices usually accept walk-in applicants. A list of DFA locations is available on its website.

 

Prepare the following documents, including photocopies:

– duly accomplished application form (download from the DFA website)
– birth certificate issued by the National Statistics Office (NSO) or certified true copy of the birth certificate from the local civil registrar authenticated by the NSO
– Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity

 

List of acceptable IDs:

– government-issued IDs (such as SSS ID, driver’s license, PRC ID, etc.)
– old college ID
– alumni ID
– old employment IDs

 

List of supporting documents (at least three):

– voter’s ID
– NSO marriage contract
– seaman’s book
– transcript of records
– NBI/police/barangay clearance
– income tax return
– community tax certificate
– school yearbook

 

Be ready to pay the fees.

If you’re willing to wait for 15 days, you may opt to pay only the regular processing fee of P950. However, for P1,200 you may get your passport within only seven days via the express processing scheme. The same fees apply for those applying for passport renewal, but if you lost your passport, additional fees will be collected.

 

There are additional requirements in some special cases.

Married women, for example, should bring a copy of their marriage contract. Minor applicants, meanwhile, should be accompanied by a parent during the passport application process. Go to the DFA website. for more details.

 

Strike a pose!

No need to bring a passport-size photo. Under the new DFA passport processing system, your photo will be taken during your personal appearance and will be digitally printed into your passport. There are some rules on photos. You should:

– look directly at the camera lens so that your full face with ears shows
– keep both eyes open (and not covered by hair) and mouth closed
– not wear eyeglasses, contact lenses, earrings or hair accessories
– keep a “neutral” facial expression; not show teeth or gums when smiling (Think Mona Lisa!)

 

Wait.

Again, if you’ve paid for regular processing, your passport will be ready in 15 days. A shorter wait of seven days meanwhile applies for express processing. By default, passports are claimed at the DFA office, but you may opt to have your passport delivered through accredited couriers. But you have to be very careful and remember never to deal with fixers!

Philippine NBI 101 – How to apply for NBI online

By Kim Arveen Patria | Yahoo! Southeast Asia Newsroom  – Sat, 25 Jan 14

Finally, you no longer have to wait in line to get an NBI clearance for the application process many Filipinos have been complaining about is online.

The online NBI clearance application system has been launched Friday at the websites of the National Bureau of Investigation and the Justice Department.

If you need the document, you should fill out the online form before going to the nearest NBI centers for payment, biometrics enrollment and release.

Some 5.6 million Filipinos were given clearances in 2013, NBI’s former biometrics service provider Realtime Data Management Services Inc. (RDMSI) said.

RDMSI data further showed that that since July 2011, an average of 21,000 people daily were given NBI clearances, a usual requirement in job applications.

NBI’s contract with RDMSI ended in December 2013, causing hiccups in the process. The agency stopped issuing of clearances in malls and satellite offices.

The NBI clearance system is now run by the Justice Department, under its National Justice Information System, which is aimed at linking justice sector institutions.

“We shall continue to roll out and implement solutions to progressively eliminate queues and simplify processes,” Justice Secretary Leila De Lima said.

“Online application is the logical next step after the switch,” she added. The DOJ statement also noted that the renewal module will also be implemented soon.

If you need an NBI clearance, visit this site: http://nbi.njis-ph.com/

Meanwhile, here are the sites you can visit to claim your clearance after payment and biometrics enrolment:

Hamsa, 22, a Filipino worker who returned home from Syria shows her passportupon arrival at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport via a chartered flight, in southern Manila, Philippines, 11 September

 

METRO MANILA

NBI Clearance Center – U.N Avenue, Ermita. Manila
Quezon City Hall – Makatarungan St, Diliman, QC
Victory Shopping Center, Alabang, Muntinlupa City
Mandaluyong City Hall – Maysilo Circle, Mandaluyong City
Las Pinas City – Las Pinas City Hall
Robinson’s Place – Basement 1 Ermita, Manila
Robinson’s Otis – Level 2 Guanzon St., Paco, Manila
Robinson’s Galleria – Basement 1 Ortigas Ave., QC
Robinson’s Metro East – Level 4 Marcos Hi-way Pasig
Robinson’s Novaliches – Novaliches, QC
Ever Gotesco Recto – 3″‘ Flr Cinema 3 Recto Ave., Manila
Duty Free Fiesta Mall – Ninoy Aquino Ave., Paranaque City
Empire Mall – Edsa, Pasay City

CORDILLERA ADMINISTRATIVE REGION (CAR)

NBI Regional Office – Upper Session Road Baguio City

REGION I
NBI Regional Office – Aguila Road Sevilla Norte San Fernando City
Dagupan District Office – A. B. Fernandez West Dagupan City
Laoag District Office – Brgy 10 P Gomez St, Laoag City

REGION II
NBI Regional Office – Government Center Carig Sur Tuguegarao City
Bayombong District Office – Capitol Compound Bayombong Nueva Vizcaya
lsabela District Office – National Highway Brgy Osmena Ilagan Isabela

REGION III
NBI Regional Office – Capitol Compound City of San Fernando Pampanga
Bulacan District Olftce – Capitol Compound Guinhawa, City of Malolos, Bulacan
Cabanatuan Dislrict Office – Llanera St Old Provincial Capitol Cmpd Cabanaluan City
Olongapo District Office – 17 Kentucky Lane Upper Kalaklan Olongapo City
Tarlac District Office – Brgy Macabulos Drive San Roque Tarlac City
Marilao Municipal Hall – Beside PNP Station, Marilao, Bulacan

REGION IV-A
NBI Regional Office – Capitol Site Capitol Hills Batangas City
Cavite District Office – J.P. Rizal St. Kaybagal South Tagaytay City
Lucena District Office – NIA Compound Genes Aguilar St., Lucena City
Laguna District Office – Rizal Blvd Brgy. Tagapo City of Sta Rosa, Laguna
Montalban Rizal – Ground Flr., Municipal Hall
Robinson’s Cainta – Level 2 Junction Cainta, Rizal
Lipa City Hall – Lipa City, Batangas
Robinson’s Dasmarinas – Dasmarinas, Cavite

REGION IV-B
NBI Regional Office – Sitio Cuadro Aguas Brgy Sta Isabel, Calapan City
Puerto Princesa District Office – Taft St., Brgy Liwanag, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan

REGION V
NBI Regional Office – Maria Cristina St.,Naga City
Legazpi District Office – Quezon Avenue Legazpi City

REGION VI
NBI Regional Office – Duran St., Fort San Pedro Iloilo City
Bacolod District Office – Aguinaldo St. Bacolod City

REGION VII
NBI Regional Office – Escario St., Capitol Site, Cebu City
Dumaguete District Office – Capitol Area Daro Dumaguete City
Ormoc Gaisano – Gaisano Capital Mall

REGION VIII
Samar District Office – Old Health Bldg., Capitol Site Catbalogan City

REGION IX
NBI Regional Office – 19 Corcuera St. Zamboanqa City
Dipolog District Office – Quezon Ave Sta Isabel, Dipolog City
Pagadian District Office – BALGU Bldg., Capitol Compound, Pagadian City

REGION X
NBI Regional Office – Capitol Compound Cagayan de Oro City
lligan District Office – IBP Bldg., Badelles St. Pala-o lliqan City

REGION XI
NBI Regional Office – J.P. Laurel Avenue, Davao City
Tagum District Office – Door 5 Duson Apt. National Highway Visayan Village Tagum

REGION XII
NBI Regional Office – 2nd Floor South Cotabato Gymnasium Koronadal City
Saranggani District Office – San Pecto St. lagao, General Santos City

REGION XIII
NBI Regional Office – 2nd Floor FCB Bldg., J Rosales Ave Butuan City

ARMM
NBI Regional Office – Governor Gutierrez Avenue. Cotabato City

 

The Job Hunter’s Interview Survival Guide

Orig. source published by Kalibrr Career Advice – January 5th, 2016

It’s job hunting season again. And there’s no scarier beast than the interview.

Interview Survival Guide

It’s the start of the New Year, and you know what that means: it’s job hunting season again. Companies are on the lookout for new hires, and job seekers (like you!) will be on the lookout for great companies. But after the resumes have been written, the applications sent, and the interviews scheduled, the hardest part remains to be the interview itself.

To help you ace one of the most iconic and crucial parts of the job search, we’ve compiled a list of the most helpful interview articles on Kalibrr Career Advice. Read through this Interview Survival Guide, and you’ll definitely find yourself getting offers in no time.

1. How To Prepare For A Job Interview

job interview

Preparation is half the battle, and many job hunters walk to their doom by going to an interview without a hint of preparation. There’s more to the interview than just the talking and the shaking of hands. Think of it like an exam that you have to pass so that your interviewer, and the company, will see how qualified you are from the role. Dindin Reyes lists down 5 easy steps to getting ready for your next interview.

2. The 5 Common Interview Questions and How to Best Answer Them

0_Interview-Crib-Sheet-Answers

Even the simplest questions can leave you stammering and stuttering if you don’t think about it in advance. In fact, the question “Tell me about yourself” can either turn you into the next employee of the century…or the worst. Make sure to read this list of common interview questions by SlideGenius before you even step into that interview room.

3. The Best Answer To The Interview Question – “Tell Me About Yourself”

The Best Answer To The Interview Question – “Tell Me About Yourself”

Speaking of the dreaded question — we wrote an article about answering “Tell me about yourself” because while it might sound so simple, it’s also just as easy to slip when answering it. Some talk about their life stories; others go wild on their hobbies and interests. And a special few will even go as far as spilling their most intimate of details. (No, don’t do that.) The question should be seen as an opportunity to sell yourself well, and Paul Rivera, CEO and Co-Founder of Kalibrr, provides simple, but great, advice on how to own it.

4. Do’s (and Don’ts) On Dressing Up For Your Next Interview

SlideGenius Wardrobe For Interview

Beauty is only skin-deep, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t care about how you look. Part of winning at a job interview is also making sure you dress right for the part. While it might seem cool to go to an interview wearing your favorite cool T-shirt or your designer blouse, will it make you look professional enough to be taken seriously? SlideGenius‘ second article for Kalbirr Career Advice put together these quick pointers on how to dress to impress, in the right way.

5. 9 Interviewer Biases Every Jobseeker Needs To Watch Out For

[FEATURE] Interview Biases-01

Interviewers are human, too. No matter how objective interviewers try to be, their personal inclinations can, and will, affect how they see you as a candidate for the job. Of course, being impressive and qualified will rarely be affected by your personality (unless you’re that unbearable), but it’s always good to know what little (or big) things can make your interviewer change his/her mind about you.

6. 8 Questions You Must Always Ask Your Interviewer (Part 1 | Part 2)

Questions to ask during an interview

Just because you’re the one getting screened for the job doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be asking questions. Once the interviewer is done grilling you about your qualifications, it’s your turn to interrogate your interviewer. This will be one of your few chances, if not the only one, to know more about the company you’re getting into and the job that you may eventually accept. Daniel Olivan gives you a list of questions that you should ask every interviewer, especially if the job seems too good to be true.

7. Things You Need To Do To Ace That Skype Interview

[FEATURE] skype

Interviews won’t always be in person, especially if you’re eyeing for a job abroad. Thanks to the broader reach of technology, Skype interviews are becoming more common in many companies. Because the interview is happening in a different space, the rules are also different. In this Career Advice post, we share with you a video that will give you tips on how to ace that Skype interview.

8. How To Respectfully Reschedule A Job Interview

[FEATURE]_Respectfully_Resched-01

Sometimes, things happen without warning. A family members gets into an accident. The roads are impossibly congested with traffic. It can even be as ridiculous as your overly playful dog ruining your one and only interview-worthy outfit. While some excuses are less excusable than others, there are cases when rescheduling an interview is unavoidable. Once you’ve decided to seriously ask for a resched, make sure to follow these pointers by Marga Salvador to help make this awkward situation go smoothly.

How to Negotiate a Higher Salary Even Without Work Experience

Money Smart | By Ryan Ong -Wed, 26 Dec 2012

There’s no need for fancy introductions here. I’ll come straight to the point: You can get paid more, even without work experience. That’s what the tips in this article are for. Here, dear MoneySmart reader, I will man you up, give you the confidence to demand your worth, and win you that dream job. Experience irrelevant. In fact, some blind kid read this last week, and now he’s the highest paid sniper in the US Army. I can’t possibly make that up, so read on:

 

Job Interview

Work experience? Well, school sure seemed like a lot of work…

 

Salaries are Arbitrary

Salaries come on a sliding scale. Even for an entry level job, for example, you can see something like “between $1,400 to $1,700″, or “Salary negotiable, $3,000 and up”.

Which leads me to ask: What justifies the difference of those few hundred dollars? Why do two people at an entry level job sometimes have salaries that are $500 or more apart?

Here’s an e-mail response from Marcus Chun, who has been a hiring manager for eight years:

It depends on the beliefs of the prospective employer. Some employers cherish work experience, and some don’t care too much for it.

In some jobs, for example sales, you can have worked in sales for 10 years, but still be a lousier salesman than a talented youngster. If the hirer is aware of this, he will be looking for your charm and intelligence during the interview, not so much your work history.”

And this opens the avenue for pay negotiations?

Yes. There are ways to impress an interviewer that could put a candidate on the high-end of the pay scale. This can happen regardless of your current work experience.”

Some methods Marcus shared with me are:

  • Posit Immediate Solutions
  • Be a Trainee
  • Merit By Association
  • Demonstrate That You Cover Your Costs

 

1. Posit Immediate Solutions

Rube Goldberg device

And then the ball hits the plate, which causes the spoon to lift and…are you listening?

 

Most newbies, when asked to present their closest thing to experience, will pull out awards they won in school. Or extra credit activities.

Now look, I’m glad you took a week to build mud huts in poverty stricken Koana or wherever. It moves me, it really does. But the hirer isn’t going to pay you more for being a great humanitarian or a boy scout. If you want higher pay, replace those abstract credentials with immediate, applicable solutions for the employer.

Find out what problems the company is facing. Ask what they need,” Marcus suggests, “Then draw up a solution for them. If need be, say ‘let me get draw up a more complete solution for this, and I’ll e-mail to you by tomorrow morning.’

If you can impress them that way, you can ask for higher pay. They might choose to overlook the experience issue, as it’s obvious you can do the job well.”

 

2. Be a Trainee

Police man with V sign

Don’t worry, I’m motivated. I’m on half pay till I solve my first actual crime.

 

“Sometimes you just have to start from the bottom,” Marcus says, “but you can determine a set point for a pay bump. For example, you can agree to be a trainee for a lower income initially. But the agreement is that, within three to six months, if your performance is acceptable, the company will take you on at a set pay. And that set pay is on the higher end.”

Marcus mentions that most SMEs (Small to Medium Enterprises) have no problems bumping a trainee’s eventual pay to the higher-end of the scale. This is because they’d rather someone they’ve gotten to know, and it lessens their commitment. After all, if they decide not to hire you at the planned pay range, they can drop you before the time comes.

But don’t bother trying this with big companies,” Marcus says, “If a big company wants a trainee, they will get a trainee. They don’t need you to offer.”

Marcus also warns against less scrupulous companies, which might take advantage of you for cheap labour. “At most six months, that’s it,” he says.

 

3. Merit By Association

Google office

Check out my paper bag. Am I getting that head developer job or what?

 

There’s a joke that if you worked in Google you can always get higher pay,” Marcus says, “Even if you worked there for less than a year, and you managed their broom closet.

Of course that’s just a joke. But if you’ve interned or worked in a prestigious company, however briefly, you have their brand name behind you.

Mention that, in your time there, some of that company’s culture and methods rubbed off on you. Say how you were impressed by this or that specific process, and go into details. This might convince the hirer that you can bring in something of value.”

Of course, not everyone has the advantage of an internship in a big name company. Which is really why you should have done that in University, instead of joining 25 Unreal tournaments.

For alternative means of building the right associations, follow us on Facebook. We’ll be giving you a primer on that soon.

 

4. Demonstrate That You Cover Your Costs

Calculator

Actually, we’re calculating the number of YEARS it would take for you to pay for yourself…

 

“Not enough people bring spreadsheets to a job interview,” Marcus says, “That’s really a pity, because it’s a good way to convince me, or whoever your hirer is, to pay more.”

The point of the spreadsheet is to show how much revenue you’ll bring. This is then contrasted against your wages, to show that you’ll more than cover your salary.

So say you’re asking for $3,500, which is actually $500 beyond the company’s budget. But if your previous sales projections show you bring in $6,000 a month, that extra $500 more than compensates for your higher pay.

The best part is, you can do this even without a previous sales record.

If you have the confidence to face me, and tell me you can generate twice your income,” Marcus says, “You’re setting a high standard for yourself.

I’d be skeptical, sure. And believe me, it will come up at a review. But between writing that promise down on a spreadsheet, and just saying ‘Oh I am a very hard worker’, which do you think is more convincing? If you want to be paid more, this is one more step to justify it.”

7 Family Rituals MUST DO to Add Meaning to Every Day

By Asha Dornfest | Babble – Thu, 10 Jan 2013

Whether religious or not, many people consider ritual and tradition to be an important (and treasured) part of life. The word ritual has such a serious ring to it, but rituals can also be simple, comforting and fun. And now that we’re past the distraction of the holidays, it’s easier to think about ritual in its less-loaded, everyday form: the little things you can do each day, each week, or each season to insert a pause for reflection or appreciation. Rituals need not be time-consuming (or all that serious) to be special. As long as they’re predictable and important to your family, they will be meaningful. Here are 7 ideas to consider. See if one resonates for you. – By Asha Dornfest

Light a candle

Photo by: Brendan DeBrincat
1. Light a candle
Lighting candles at mealtime naturally quiets things down and encourages reflection. (Unless your kids are toddlers or pyromaniacs, of course.)

 

Give thanks

Photo by: Ali Edwards
2. Give thanks
Expressing gratitude before you eat — such a simple way to pause. No need to include religion if that’s not your thing.

 

Friday night dessert

Photo by: Benny Mazur
3. Friday night dessert
We make Friday nights special by serving a treat. It encourages our kids to invite friends over instead of making plans, and it takes dessert out of the “daily” realm and into the “special.”

 

Change of venue

Photo by: Danny Sullivan
4. Change of venue
Dinner in the living room. Sleepover in the basement. “Predictable variety” is exciting.

 

Weekly family fun night

Photo by: Morgan
5. Weekly family fun night
Movie night, game night, quiet reading night…whatever you enjoy.

 

Scheduled phone calls

Photo by: Julie Corsi
6. Scheduled phone calls
Regular calls to the grandparents or far-flung friends maintains connections and adds rhythm to the week

 

Coming of age rituals

Photo by: Etsy/HouseHoldWords
7. Coming of age rituals
Monthly growth chart recordings, weekly allowance…these small actions let a kid know she’s growing up.

How to form a lifelong bond with your child (while running a career)?

By Cecile Baltasar for Yahoo Southeast Asia | Yahoo SHE – Mon, 6 January 2014
How to form a lifelong bond with your child (while running a career)

Here’s a question many working parents ask: how do you form a strong bond with your child when your to-do list is packed with meetings, errands, and desk work from 7 AM to 8 PM every weekday?

The solution is simple: “Spend uninterrupted time with your children for at least 30 minutes every day,” says Maribel Dionisio, MA, a parenting and relationship consultant at AMD Love Consultants for Families and Couples.

Here are a few tips to help you do just that:

Have daily one-on-one sessions with each child. “When you get home, rest for 20 minutes, then spend the next 30 minutes with one child,” suggests Dionisio. “Take a break for a few minutes, then move on to the next child.” It may take some adjusting at first, but once you’ve established a routine, it will become easier.

“Many parents complain to me, ‘How can I give 30 minutes every day when I have so many other things I need to do?’” says Dionisio. “I tell them, ‘If you can’t give 30 minutes a day, then there goes your influence on your child. How will you get to know your child if you don’t spend time with him or her?’”

To be able to do this effectively, consistently, and without regret, you will have to line up your priorities. And you’ll have to say no to things that are of less concern to you so you can focus on your children.

Go on weekly solo dates with each child, as well. Dionisio says apart from spending exclusive time with your kids daily, it’s also important for each parent to take each of the kids out on one-on-one dates every week (or every two weeks).

But there’s one rule: “You have to do it on a budget of P50,” says Dionisio. That will force you and your child to be creative, and it will teach your child financial responsibility at the same time. Will you have ice cream at an outdoor playground? Kick around a ball in the UP sunken garden? Part of the fun would be figuring out with your child what you can do together.

“This weekly date will be so special to your child because he will have you all to himself,” says Dionisio. “Make sure there’s no interruption from anyone. Turn off all your gadgets. And then just talk with your child: ‘Who’s your best friend? What’s your teacher like?’”

Set a schedule and let everyone know about it. This one-on-one project is a family effort, so everyone has to be in on it wholeheartedly. Both parents have to figure out a schedule for the weekly dates—who takes whom out, how long they’ll be out, etc. Divide your time wisely, especially if you have many kids. Write down this schedule and put it up where everyone in your family can see. This will create a routine, help parents figure out their priorities, and show kids when their turn is with you.

“If you do this consistently and with love, you’ll see the results immediately,” says Dionisio.

With teenagers, you’ll have to be creative. “Your weekly dates won’t be good enough anymore when your kids become teenagers,” says Dionisio. When that time comes, you’ll have to be more creative because you’ll be the one chasing them to spend time with you. Is your teen going to her friend’s house? Offer to drive her over. Does your son need some supplies from the bookstore? Offer to go shopping with him. Does your daughter have rehearsals at school? Pick her up and take her out for ice cream after.

Or, Dionisio suggests, “Just say, ‘I heard there’s this new restaurant. You want to try it with me?’ Let them know it’s your special time with them. But don’t label it a date or your kids will say, ‘Yuck, you’re corny, Mom.’”

Don’t use a cookie-cutter routine for all your kids. Because each child is different, you’ll have to treat them differently, as well.

“Your eldest and your second child probably think in opposite ways,” says Dionisio. “If you put both kids together and force them to do the same things with you, normally, they’ll just end up fighting. Or you might inadvertently give more attention to the louder child. Your alone time has to be custom-fit for each child. Some kids need more alone time with their parents than other kids.”

If your child likes to doodle, tape sheets of manila paper on one wall of your house and paint a mural with her. If your other child likes to read books, take him to the National library on your weekend date, and scour the shelves for interesting children’s books.

Take advantage while they’re still young. Spending time with your children is important, more so while they’re still young.

“It takes three to five years to change behavior,” says Dionisio. “The sooner parents understand this principle, the better. Their positive relationship with their kids will give parents leverage if they have relationship problems with their kids later on. They won’t have to do repair work [on their kids’ attitude] if they work on it now.”

And by ‘working on it,’ that means spending quality (and quantity) time with your kids. If you connect with them this way for their first 10 years, you’ll be able to connect with them for the rest of their lives.

Are you financially ready for a family emergency?

By Mike Aquino for Yahoo! Southeast Asia | BDO Money Matters – Mon, 20 May 2013

To have children, the author Elizabeth Stone once wrote, “is to decide forever to have your heart go walking around outside your body.”

Sleepless nights ensue—once, you were the sole subject of your financial priorities, now you’ve got your spouse and kids to worry about. Even if you’ve got things well in hand now… are you sure you’ve got everything covered, even the emergencies?

While Filipinos are generally not lacking in the sacrifice-everything-for-their-children department, most of us don’t have the financial savvy to properly prepare for a future emergency. “We have this, ‘sige, bahala na, the money’s there’ mindset,” says personal finance consultant Randell Tiongson. “A lot of people start with the life insurance policy, the educational program, all these things, but what about emergency funds?”

Tiongson believes in a certain order to laying the financial groundwork for a family emergency. “There are certain things you have to satisfy first,” explains Tiongson, pointing to your home finances and your debt. Tiongson suggests you do the following, in order:

1. Sort out your finances. “You should spend less on what you make, be able to balance your checkbook, see that you’re spending less than what you’re earning, and generating enough savings. That’s one,” says Tiongson. “If you’re in debt, then the next step is getting out of debt.”

2. Start an emergency fund. “It seems to be uncommon to a lot of us Filipinos,” says Tiongson. “But right financial planning necessitates that you set aside a certain amount of money for emergencies—what we call an emergency fund.”

Tiongson varies the amount he advises you reserve for your emergency fund, depending on your employment situation. “For employees, I’d say three months is the least,” he explains. “If you’re in business, six months to a year. In business kasi, hindi mo alam what’s going to happen.”

Emergency funds are not to be invested in stocks, property or mutual funds. “Ideally, it has to be cash or near-cash,” says Tiongson. “Time deposits are okay, if they can be cashed easily. When you put your emergency fund in, say, a bond fund, there’s that risk of fluctuation: if it fluctuates and it’s the time you need it, lugi ka.”

3. Buy life insurance. For the worst emergency of all—the kind that takes you permanently out of the picture for your kids—you’ll want to make sure they’re taken care of even in your absence. “If you have a dependent, like children, you want to cover that,” says Tiongson. As a rule of thumb, Tiongson suggests you get coverage equivalent to “between three to five times your annual salary.”

4. Cover health emergencies. If you’re an employee, chances are most of your medical expenses are covered (to a certain point) by the office HMO. But if the office HMO doesn’t cover your dependents—or fails to cover them to your satisfaction—the option to buy further coverage is always there. “You buy something that you can afford,” says Tiongson. “Of course, the really good ones are expensive. You may want a bigger room, but can you afford the premium?”

Tiongson suggests you make a priority of keeping tabs on your HMO and insurance premiums. “You also have to track that these things are being paid,” he warns. “Baka mamaya hindi naman bayad ang premium. If it’s not paid, what good is it?”

5. Get a lifeline. Tiongson advises that you use a line of credit—personal loans or credit cards—as a backup emergency fund: not to be used until all other options are exhausted.

“The idea is you start a savings program, but you keep credit handy,” explains Tiongson. “That’s why you should be very careful managing your credit—baka mamaya kung kailan mo kailangan, na-max out ang credit card mo!”

Take note, the order of these items is not interchangeable: the first two items should always be first on the agenda, though not necessarily in consecutive order. “I recommend you do this simultaneously,” says Tiongson. “Fix the way you spend, slowly get out of debt, and at the same time, build your emergency funds before you do other things like buying insurance.”

13th Month Pay: How is it Computed?

By Pinoy-Business.com & DOLE website

Time flies so fast and before you know it, the year-end is just around the corner. There’s the thought of Christmas and, yes, 13th-month pay, which the law requires to be paid not later than December 24 of each year.

The law – Presidential Decree No. 851 – requires all employers to pay their rank-and-file employees, regardless of the nature of their employment and irrespective of the method by which their wages are paid, an equivalent to at least one (1) month of their wages as 13th month pay. To be entitled to 13th-month pay, these employees must have worked for at least one month during the calendar year.

The 13th-month pay of an employee is based on the “basic salary,” which includes all remunerations or earnings paid by an employer to an employee for services rendered. However, 13th-month pay does not include cost-of-living allowances (COLA) granted pursuant to P.D. No. 525 or Letter of Instruction No. 174, profit-sharing payments, and all allowances and monetary benefits which are not considered or integrated as part of the regular or basic salary of the employee. Maternity benefits, like other benefits granted by the SSS, are are not included in computing the employee’s 13th-month pay. Overtime pay, earnings and other remunerations are also excluded from “basic salary” in the computation of the 13th-month pay.

There’s a catch, though. If these items, which are legally excluded from the computation of 13th month pay, are included by the employer in its previous computations and such act ripens into a “company practice,” then these items can’t be excluded without violating the prohibition against diminution or elimination of  benefits.

FORMULA AND COMPUTATION OF 13TH MONTH PAY (source: DOLE website)

Total basic salary earned during the year / 12 Months = Proportionate 13th Month Pay

Illustration: Using the basic wage in the NCR at 436.00 per day and a six-day workweek or an equivalent Monthly Basic Salary of P11,372.33, to wit:

Months Attendance Salary in a Month
January no absence P11,372.33
February no absence P11,372.33
March 1 day leave w/ pay P11,372.33
April no absence P11,372.33
May 2 days leave w/ pay P11,372.33
June 2 days leave w/ pay P11,372.33
July no absence P11,372.33
August 2 days leave w/ pay P11,372.33
September on maternity leave no salary
October on maternity leave no salary
November no absence P11,372.33
December 5 days leave w/o pay 9,192.33
P111,543.33 / 12 months P9,295.28 is the proportionate 13th month pay

Note:
1. COLA of P30.00 under Wage Order No. NCR 17 is not included in the basic salary in computing 13th month pay.

2. The 2 months of maternity leave are not included in the computation of 13th month pay because the female employee has no earnings from the company for the period.

Piso ‘Yan Principle

By CBNAsia.org | Wed, 24 April 2013

3 very powerful budgeting principles

Nakakita ka na ba ng taong nag-planong sirain ang buhay niya? Malamang, hindi pa. Pero bakit maraming taong sira ang buhay? Kasi, hindi sila nag-plano ng kanilang buhay. 

Kurot PrincipleAng sabi nga nila, “People don’t plan to fail, they just failed to plan.”  

Ito ang isa sa pinakamalaking problema ng mga Pilipino. Hindi tayo marunong mag-plano. Asar na asar tayo sa pagpa-plano. Kaya hindi tayo yumayaman.

Eh tayo, ano ang ginagawa natin? Bara-bara ‘bay, o kaya, “Que sera, sera, whatever will be, will be!  The future’s not ours to see!  Que sera, sera!” Ganyan tayo!

Ang pagyaman ay hindi tsambahan. Itanong mo kay Tony Tan Caktiong, Henry Sy, o kaya kay Lucio Tan o kay John Gokongwei. Hindi sila tsumamba sa pagyaman. Nasa plano nila iyon. So ang buhay, pina-plano! Kaya napaka-importante ng pagpa-plano.

Ito ang Step No. 5 on how to unleash the highest potential of your money: You must plan to achieve your goals by having a… budget. Paano mag-plano sa pera? Dapat mag-budget.

What is a Budget? 

A budget is a plan that balances income and expenses. Napakasimple ng budget. Babalansehin mo lang ang iyong kinikita sa iyong expenses! Ganoon lang? Oo, ganoon lang.

Pero bago ka namin turuan kung paano mag-budget, tuturuan ka muna namin ng three very powerful budgeting principles! Sa totoo lang, gawin mo lang ang tatlong ito, gaganda na ang buhay mo (kahit hindi mo gawin ‘yung iba). Pero mas maganda kung gagawin mo itong tatlo at gagawin mo rin ‘yung iba. Tatlong prinsipyo, tandaan!

The First Budget Principle 

Ang unang prinsipyo: “Piso ‘yan.” 

Ano ang gagawin mo kung sa paglalakad mo sa kalye ay nakakita ka ng piso? Ano ang gagawin mo? Dadamputin?  Dadamputin mo ang piso? Ang dumi-dumi na ‘nun!

May halaga pa ba ang piso ngayon? Aber, ano ang mabibili ng piso? Ano? Kendi? Alam mo, ang laki-laki ng problema nating mga Pilipino. Ang pisong madumi, pinupulot natin. Ang pisong malinis, tinatapon natin.

Ano ulit? Ang pisong madumi, pinupulot; ang pisong malinis, tinatapon!

Anong piso ang tinatapon natin? Heto: gaano na karaming piso ang itinapon mo sa walang kakuwenta-kuwentang text?

Ito ang sinasabi ko sa iyo: importante ang piso. Ang problema, kapag lumapit sa iyo ang anak mo at humingi ng piso, anong gagawin mo?  Bibigyan mo?  Hindi! Bakit? Wala ng bata ang humihingi ng piso! Hindi na sila humihingi ng barya! Gusto nila, papel!

Ang sabi ng Nanay, “P20 bibigyan ko. Sir, P20 LANG naman ‘yan e! Pag-aawayan pa ba ‘yan?”

Kapag nagpunta ka ng mall, nakakita ka ng T-shirt. Dating P500, ngayon ay sale. P200 na lang.  Bibilhin mo?

“Syempre naman, Sir!  Nakatipid ako ng P300!”

Nakita mo lang ay nakatipid ka ng P300. Hindi mo nakita na gumastos ka ng P200! Sa isang T-shirt na hindi mo naman gaanong susuotin.  Nandiyan ka pa ba?

“Sir, sayang naman. Sale!”

Hindi mo malaman ang gagawin mo. Nanginginig ka pa na parang ayaw mong umalis kasi baka pag-alis mo ay mawala na yung T-shirt! Kaya ayaw mong umalis! Ayaw mo pang umuwi. Ang laki ng problema mo! Sayang kasi P200 LANG!

Ito po ang unang-unang prinsipyo sa budgeting: Piso ‘yan! Piso ‘yan! Basahing muli… PISO ‘YAN!

Mula sa araw na ito, bago bumitaw ng piso, ilagay sa isip, PISO ‘YAN! Hindi piso LANG ‘yan! Napaka-importante niyan. Bago bitawan ang piso, pag-isipan muna nang matagal. Pangako, yayaman ka.

Sino ang pinakamayayamang tao sa Pilipinas ngayon? Mga Chinese taipan!  Tony Tan Caktiong, Henry Sy, Lucio Tan, Gokongwei! Iyan ang mga mayayaman! Alam n’yo ba kung bakit sila mayaman? Dahil sa kanilang budgeting principles.

Ano ang budgeting principles ng mga Chinese? “Hindi mabubuo ang piso ‘pag walang singko.” Sa kanila, importante ang singko. Kaya bago sila bumitaw ng singko, pinag-iisipang mabuti. Tayo, tapon na lang nang tapon.

Kung gusto mong yumaman, bago bumitaw ng piso, isipin muna, piso ‘yan!

Application: Halimbawa, nagte-text ka at mag-se-send ka na, pero naisip mo, piso ‘yan! Huwag mo na lang i-text! Napaka-simple! Nakatipid ka ng piso. ‘Pag nakatipid ka ng 100 na P1, P100 na iyon. ‘Pag nakatipid ka ng 10 na P100, isang libong piso na iyon. Alam mo ba na ‘pag may isang libong piso ka, P999,000 na lang, milyonaryo ka na?

Paalala lang, ang ibang mga text, related sa trabaho ha!  Hindi ‘yun ang pinag-uusapan natin. Iba naman ang mga walang kakuwenta-kuwentang text at ang mga text na “Wer na u?”, “Here na me!”, ”K” – ito yung mga ‘yun. Iba po ‘yung office-related. Doon po tayo kumikita. These are not expenses.  Ano’ng tawag doon? Investment. May ROI (return on investment) ‘yon!  Okay ‘yon!

So, kapag humingi ulit ang anak mo ng piso, ano ang gagawin mo? Ako, kapag humihingi ng piso ang anak ko, hinihingan ko ng justification. Tinatanong ko, “Anak, bakit ka nanghihingi ng piso?” Ang sagot ng bata, “Kasi Daddy bibili ako ng candy.”

Tanong ko ulit, “Bakit mo kailangan ng candy?” Ang sagot ng bata, “Gusto ko po kasi… uh… uh…” Wala ng masabi ang bata. Wala ng maisip. Kaya, “Uh… gusto ko lang po!”

Hindi puwede ‘yun! Kayo ba sa kumpanya n’yo, puwedeng, “Sir, kailangan ko po ng P10,000.” Kapag tinanong ka kung bakit, ang sagot mo ba ay, “Gusto ko lang po!”  Hindi puwede!  Dapat may dahilan!

So, anong sasabihin mo sa bata – “Bakit mo kailangan ng candy?” Kakamot na lang ng ulo ‘yun at sasabihin sa iyo, “Sige po, ‘wag na lang po!” Nakatipid na ako ng piso!

Next week, pag-uusapan natin ang ikalawang budgeting principle.

(Excerpted from Vic and Avelynn Garcia’s book entitled Kontento Ka Na Ba Sa KaPERAhan Mo? available in National Bookstore, Powerbooks, Fullybooked, OMF and other leading bookstores nationwide. Also available in Unleash International Bookstore. For details, please contact 0922-UNLEASH (8653274) or 664-0892, 632-0148 local 8002-8003.)

Kurot Principle

By CBNAsia.org | Wed, 24 April 2013

3 very powerful budgeting principles

Last week, I discussed the first principle in budgeting. Ito ay ang Piso ‘Yan Principle

Now, let’s go to Principle No. 2: Kurot Principle.

Kurot PrincipleAno ‘yung Kurot Principle? Ay, ang ganda nitong Kurot Principle na ito. To better understand this, I will tell you a story of a person na balak bumili ng cellphone worth P1,000. Nagkataong mayroon siyang P100,000 na savings. Puwede ba siyang bumili ng cellphone? Puwede, kasi yung P1,000, kurot lang ‘yon sa kanyang savings.

May pangalawang taong balak bumili ng cellphone. Ang bibilhin niya ay worth P1,000 din. Mayroon siyang savings sa bangko na P1,000. Bumili siya ng cellphone. Anong tawag dun? Dakot na ‘yun! Dinakot lahat ang pera niya!

May pangatlong tao, balak bumili ng cellphone, pero walang savings.  P1,000 lang naman ‘yung bibilhin niya. Bumili siya. Anong tawag ‘dun?  Utang na ‘yun!

Ang tanong: ano’ng prinsipyo ang ginagamit mo sa buhay mo? Kurot, dakot, o utang?

Magtataka pa ba tayo kung bakit tayo naghihirap o baon sa utang? Ang gagaling nating dumakot! Ang gagaling nating umutang! Gusto mong yumaman? Starting today, matutong kumurot. Kapag may bibilhin, dapat kinukurot lang! Nagkakaintindihan ba tayo? Kapag ginawa mo ito, pangako, yayaman ka.

Pag-aralan nating muli ang mga pinakamayayaman sa Pilipinas, ang Chinoy. Again, bakit sila mayayaman? Ang gagaling nilang… kumurot!  Tayo ang gagaling nating… dumakot! Sasampolan kita…

Pinoy vs. Chinoy Businessman 

May dalawang negosyanteng nagsimula ng kanilang negosyo, isang Pinoy at isang Chinoy. Ang capital nila pareho ay P100,000.

Sa unang buwan, si Pinoy, kumita ng P10,000. Ano ang iniisip bilhin? Cellphone. Si Chinoy, kumita rin ng P10,000. Ano ang gagawin niya? Idadagdag niya sa puhunan.

So magkano na ngayon ang puhunan ni Chinoy? P110,000! Si Pinoy, P100,000 pa rin, pero may bago siyang cellphone. Ang ganda!

Ituloy natin. After a few months, maganda ang takbo ng negosyo. Si Pinoy kumita ng P50,000. Ang Pilipinong may P50,000, ano ang balak bilhin? Bibili siya ng home theater, DVD, at LCD TV! Si Chinoy, kumita rin ng P50,000. Anong gagawin niya? Idadagdag uli sa puhunan niya. Magkano na ang puhunan niya? P160,000 na!

A few months later pa, ang Pinoy kumita ng P150,000! Ang Pilipinong mayroong P150,000, ano ang balak bilhin? Second-hand na kotse o pang-downpayment sa bagong kotse. Ang Chinoy, may P150,000. Ano’ng gagawin niya? Idadagdag sa puhunan! Magkano na ang puhunan niya? P310,000!

Buwan-buwan, si Pinoy kumikita. Dagdag siya ng dagdag ng gamit. Magkano ang puhunan niya? P100,000! Si Chinoy, buwan-buwan kumikita. Ano ang ginagawa niya? Dagdag ng dagdag sa puhunan niya. One day, Chinoy was able to save P1 million!  So ginawa niya, he approached one supplier and said, “Supplier, kung bibili ako sa‘yo ng worth P1 million, bibigyan mo ba ako ng discount?” Hulaan mo kung ano ang sasabihin ng supplier. “Of course, ang dami mong bibilhin, kaya bibigyan kita ng additional 5% discount!”

Ngunit naisip ni Chinoy, “Hindi naman yata maganda na sa akin lahat ang 5%. Ang gagawin ko, bibigyan ko ang customers ko ng 3% discount at sa akin na lang ‘yung 2%.” Ibig sabihin, bababa ang presyo ng kanyang mga ibinebentang produkto.

It just so happened na magkatabi ang tindahan ni Chinoy at ni Pinoy. Pareho sila ng mga produktong ibinebenta. Given the situation, kanino kayo bibili? Kay Chinoy, because it’s cheaper. Ano ang mangyayari sa negosyo ni Pinoy? Malulugi na. Kasi mas mahal ang kaniyang produkto. Ano ang gagawin niya? Ibebenta niya ‘yung kotseng nabili niya ng P150,000. Sino ang bibili? Siyempre, ang maraming pera, si Chinoy. Tatawaran pa ni Chinoy ang kotse ng P80,000. Dahil gipit na si Pinoy, kahit palugi ay ibebenta na rin niya.  Si Chinoy ngayon ay nagkaroon ng kotse na murang-mura lang!

After a few months, mauubos din ang P80,000 ni Pinoy. Ano ang susunod na gagawin ni Pinoy? Ang home entertainment niya ay ibebenta na rin. Magkano? P20,000 na lang. Sino ang bibili? Si Chinoy. Darating ang araw na pati ang cellphone ni Pinoy ay ibebenta na niya. Magkano niya ibebenta? P2,000 na lang! Isang araw, magsasara na ang negosyo ni Pinoy. Ano ang gagawin niya? Malamang, magtatrabaho na lang siya kay Chinoy. Ito ang kuwento ng bansang Pilipinas!

Naalala mo pa ba noong araw, mas mayayaman ang mga Pinoy kaysa sa mga Chinese. Bakit nagbago? Ano ba ang problema natin? Dakot kasi tayo ng dakot! Sila, kurot lang ng kurot!

Mayroon kaming naging participant before na nagsabi, “Sir, hindi naman totoo ‘yan! I know a Chinoy, he drives a BMW. That’s a P5 million car! Kurot ba ‘yun?” Malamang kurot ‘yun! Noong binili niya ‘yun, mayroon na siyang P100 million na savings!  So kurot lang ‘yun!  Nandiyan ka pa ba?

Isang Kahig, Isang Tuka 

Saan ka makakakita ng mga taong isang kahig, isang tuka? Saan? Sa squatters area? Magtigil ka! Gusto mo’ng makakita ng mga taong isang kahig, isang-tuka? Sa Ortigas, sa Makati, may makikita ka.

What do I mean? Kapag hindi ka sumuweldo ng isang buwan, mabubuhay ba ang pamilya mo? Kung wala kang credit card, kung mawalan ka ng trabaho ngayon, ilang araw ang aabutin para mabuhay ng matino ang pamilya mo? Kapag nawalan ka ng suweldo, patay ka!

Ang mga Chinoy, kahit hindi muna kumita o magnegosyo, mabubuhay ng maganda. Bakit po?  Kasi many years ago, kumahig sila ng kumahig at tumuka lang konti. Kaya marami sa kanila ngayon, tuka na lang ng tuka. Maraming Pinoy, kapag hindi tayo kumahig, wala tayong tutukain.

Ito ang masakit–sometimes, kahit matanda na tayo, kahig pa rin tayo ng kahig. Gaano karaming Pilipino ang 60 years old  na ay trabaho pa rin ng trabaho? Puwede ba, simula ngayon, kumahig ka nang kumahig at iwasan munang  tumuka. I-deprive ang sarili ng kaunti.

Ang pinakamasakit sa lahat ay ito–one day, you want to work, but you cannot work. You are already old. Why? Nagpakasasa ka kasi noong bata ka pa. Inubos mo na lahat ng lakas at kalusugan mo sa bisyo.

Tanong: Masama ba’ng bumili ng mahal? Sagot: Hindi! Basta kinukurot lang! Kapag nakakita ka ng kasamahan mong naka-Nike shoes, huwag mong husgahan kaagad iyong tao! Malay mo, kinurot lang niya iyon. At the end of the day, what is happening to other people is not important. What’s more important is what is happening to you.

The Bible says in 1 Thessalonians 4:11, “Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life. You should mind your own business and work with your hands, just as we told you.” 

Next week, I will discuss the third principle in budgeting.

 

(Excerpted from Vic and Avelynn Garcia’s book entitled Kontento Ka Na Ba Sa KaPERAhan Mo? available in National Bookstore, Powerbooks, Fullybooked, OMF and other leading bookstores nationwide. Also available in Unleash International Bookstore. For details, please contact 0922-UNLEASH (8653274) or 664-0892, 632-0148 local 8002-8003.)