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Article post about Government related document processing and other matters

 

How to get a Driver’s License in the Philippines?

Sourced MoneyMax.ph  | January 13th 2015

MM_DriversLicense_100314

There’s this indescribable mix of excitement and anxiety for first-time drivers and first-time car owners. But to take things on a legal point, you definitely need a driver’s license before you bring your wheels on the major roads. Spare yourself from spending your first thousand of pesos to the MMDA for driving without license.

The Land Transportation Office (LTO), under the Department of Transportation and Communications (DOTC), is responsible in drivers licensing and motor vehicle registrations. According to the Official Gazette (gov.ph), a driver’s license is “an official document authorizing an individual to drive a motorized vehicle in the Philippines.

read more: List of LTO Branches

LTO has three classifications of drivers licensing: student permit, non-professional driver’s license, and professional driver’s license. Before going to any branch, you have to decide what kind of license you will get. As the name implies, a Professional Driver’s License entitles you to drive a vehicle for a living. Apply for Professional license if you will drive any public utility vehicles (PUVs) such as jeepneys, tricycles, taxi, etc. On the other hand, a Non-Professional Driver’s License allows you to drive private vehicles. In both licenses, a prerequisite is a valid student’s permit, which is “an official document authorizing a person to operate a motorized vehicle in the presence of a duly licensed driver.”

Eligibility for Drivers Licensing:

  1. You must be at least seventeen (17) years old.
  2. You must be physically and mentally fit to operate a motor vehicle.
  3. You must not be a drug user or alcoholic.
  4. You must be able to read and write in Filipino or English.
  5. You must be clean, neat and presentable.

For Non-Pro driver’s license, take note of these steps:

List of Driver’s License Requirements

  1. Duly accomplished Application form for Driver’s License (ADL).
  2. Valid Student Permit (at least 1 month old)
  3. Medical Certificate with Official Receipt (from LTO accredited or Government physician)
  4. Taxpayer’s Identification Number (TIN) if employed
  5. Passing score in the written and practical examinations

 

1. Get a Student Permit

Before applying, you should accomplish a Student Permit also from LTO. When testing your driving skills on the road on your first few tries, you’ll need to present this permit to authorities who might issue you a ticket. A student permit will cost you around PHP 300 for 2-3 hours of processing. The one-month-old student permit is your time to really practice your driving.

2. Medical Examination

Before filing your application for a driver’s license on the same day, you will be required to get a medical examination which will cost around PHP500. Make sure that you only deal with LTO-accredited clinics, usually near the LTO branch.

3. Road Signs and Major Traffic Rules

As early as the thought of driving pops in your head, be wary of the road signs. In your exam, you will be asked for around 50 questions of road signs. If you pass the exam, you will get in to the next step.

4. Practice driving

When you apply for any of the two driver’s license, your skills will be test through a practical exam facilitated by an LTO officer and gauge if you’re capable of driving. It is notable though that a lot of people brags about getting a license without undergoing this process. But in reality, these people are the ones who get caught in vehicular mishaps because of foolish risks. No one is worthy to be on the road without any driving knowledge.

Here’s a run-through of your expense for that day:

Transaction Cost
Medical Examination Php 100.00
Application Fee + Computer Fee Php 167.63
Driving Test Fee Php 400.00
License Fee + Computer Fee Php 417.63
TOTAL COST Php 1,085.26

Source: http://www.lto.gov.ph/index.php/services/drivers-licensing/115-summary-of-drivers-license-and-permits-fees-and-charges

How to process a Pag-IBIG Loan the Step-By-Step Guide

Published by iMoney Philippines  | Rouselle Isla – August 19th, 2016

Step-By-Step Guide on How to Get a Pag-IBIG Loan

One of the great benefits of being a member of Pag-IBIG Fund is the housing loan. If you are not over 65 years old and have remitted 24 monthly contributions to Pag-IBIG Fund, you may avail of this housing loan. You should not have any outstanding housing or multi-purpose loans with Pag-IBIG, nor should you have a Pag-IBIG housing loan that had been cancelled, bought back, or foreclosed.

Even minimum wage earners can have the opportunity to buy their own home through the Affordable Housing Program. With the End-User Financing Program, members can borrow up to ₱6 million. The maximum repayment period for a Pag-IBIG Fund housing loan is 30 years. Know how to apply for one in just five steps.

1) Get The Relevant Forms

You can get the housing loan application form and the checklist of requirements by visiting your nearest Pag-IBIG Fund office, or by going online and visiting www.pagibigfund.gov.ph. Click on the link that says “Forms” and you can download them for free.

You need to accomplish a medical questionnaire and undergo a full medical examination if you are over 60 years old and an OFW, or if you are 60 years old and borrowing over ₱2 million up to ₱6 million.

If you are curious about rates, you can easily do a quick check by using our online calculator. This will give you an idea on the current BPI housing loan interest rate in comparison to other banks.

2) Submit Your Pag-IBIG Fund Housing Loan Application

After filling out the necessary forms and completing the requirements, you can submit your application. There is a non-refundable partial processing fee of ₱1,000 that you will need to pay upon submission of application.

If the property is located in NCR, you can head to the Pag-IBIG Fund offices in Shaw Boulevard, Kamias, or Imus. If it’s a provincial property, you can file the application at the nearest Pag-IBIG Fund office to the said property.

If you prefer to do it online, go to www.pagibigfund.gov.ph and click on E-Services. Note that it takes about 20 working days to process your housing loan. This includes property valuation and credit investigation already.

3) Receive Your Notice of Approval

If your housing loan application is approved, you will receive your Notice of Approval (NOA) or Letter of Guarantee (LOG). You can now sign your loan documents.

If your loan application is disapproved, it could be because of several reasons. When evaluating your loan application, Pag-IBIG Fund will also check your records, employment status, and your capacity to pay. They will evaluate the property and its appraised value. If you fail to meet any of these requirements, your loan application will get disapproved.

4) Complete Your NOA Requirements

You have 90 days to accomplish your NOA requirements. Note that there will be different requirements depending on the property you want to purchase. We suggest that you do it right away because some of the requirements take days, or even weeks to complete. Don’t do it at the last minute. The sooner you can submit complete and correct documents, the sooner your check will be released to you.

5) Receive Your Loan Proceeds

You can now collect your loan proceeds from Pag-IBIG Fund. Just present two valid IDs. You should also bring 12 postdated checks with you if payment for the loan is not through salary deduction. Once you have the check with you, just give it to the seller of the property as your payment.

If you’re looking for more information, you can check our guide on everything you need to know in getting a pag ibig housing loan.

Philippine Passport 101 – How to apply for a passport

By Yahoo! Philippines | News – Sat, 14 Sep 2013

Whether you’re going out of the country to work, study or just see the world, you will need a passport. This official document is proof that you are a Filipino citizen traveling under the protection of the Philippine government to and from foreign countries.

Philippine passports are issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA). In Metro Manila, applicants should set an appointment when applying for a passport at the DFA main and satellite offices while those in provinces may apply through the nearest regional consular office.

What do you need to do to get a passport? For first-time applicants, we’ve put up a basic guide from information on the DFA website. For the location map of all DFA passport processing offices in Metro Manila you may go to this link: http://emcph.net/getting-passport-made-easy-while-shopping/

Hamsa, 22, a Filipino worker who returned home from Syria shows her passportupon arrival at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport via a chartered flight, in southern Manila, Philippines, 11 September

Show up at the DFA office.

For Metro Manila applicants, this means you need to set an appointment online anytime or via hotline (02) 737-1000 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday. For those in provinces, meanwhile, regional consular offices usually accept walk-in applicants. A list of DFA locations is available on its website.

 

Prepare the following documents, including photocopies:

– duly accomplished application form (download from the DFA website)
– birth certificate issued by the National Statistics Office (NSO) or certified true copy of the birth certificate from the local civil registrar authenticated by the NSO
– Valid picture IDs and supporting documents to prove identity

 

List of acceptable IDs:

– government-issued IDs (such as SSS ID, driver’s license, PRC ID, etc.)
– old college ID
– alumni ID
– old employment IDs

 

List of supporting documents (at least three):

– voter’s ID
– NSO marriage contract
– seaman’s book
– transcript of records
– NBI/police/barangay clearance
– income tax return
– community tax certificate
– school yearbook

 

Be ready to pay the fees.

If you’re willing to wait for 15 days, you may opt to pay only the regular processing fee of P950. However, for P1,200 you may get your passport within only seven days via the express processing scheme. The same fees apply for those applying for passport renewal, but if you lost your passport, additional fees will be collected.

 

There are additional requirements in some special cases.

Married women, for example, should bring a copy of their marriage contract. Minor applicants, meanwhile, should be accompanied by a parent during the passport application process. Go to the DFA website. for more details.

 

Strike a pose!

No need to bring a passport-size photo. Under the new DFA passport processing system, your photo will be taken during your personal appearance and will be digitally printed into your passport. There are some rules on photos. You should:

– look directly at the camera lens so that your full face with ears shows
– keep both eyes open (and not covered by hair) and mouth closed
– not wear eyeglasses, contact lenses, earrings or hair accessories
– keep a “neutral” facial expression; not show teeth or gums when smiling (Think Mona Lisa!)

 

Wait.

Again, if you’ve paid for regular processing, your passport will be ready in 15 days. A shorter wait of seven days meanwhile applies for express processing. By default, passports are claimed at the DFA office, but you may opt to have your passport delivered through accredited couriers. But you have to be very careful and remember never to deal with fixers!

Philippine NBI 101 – How to apply for NBI online

By Kim Arveen Patria | Yahoo! Southeast Asia Newsroom  – Sat, 25 Jan 14

Finally, you no longer have to wait in line to get an NBI clearance for the application process many Filipinos have been complaining about is online.

The online NBI clearance application system has been launched Friday at the websites of the National Bureau of Investigation and the Justice Department.

If you need the document, you should fill out the online form before going to the nearest NBI centers for payment, biometrics enrollment and release.

Some 5.6 million Filipinos were given clearances in 2013, NBI’s former biometrics service provider Realtime Data Management Services Inc. (RDMSI) said.

RDMSI data further showed that that since July 2011, an average of 21,000 people daily were given NBI clearances, a usual requirement in job applications.

NBI’s contract with RDMSI ended in December 2013, causing hiccups in the process. The agency stopped issuing of clearances in malls and satellite offices.

The NBI clearance system is now run by the Justice Department, under its National Justice Information System, which is aimed at linking justice sector institutions.

“We shall continue to roll out and implement solutions to progressively eliminate queues and simplify processes,” Justice Secretary Leila De Lima said.

“Online application is the logical next step after the switch,” she added. The DOJ statement also noted that the renewal module will also be implemented soon.

If you need an NBI clearance, visit this site: http://nbi.njis-ph.com/

Meanwhile, here are the sites you can visit to claim your clearance after payment and biometrics enrolment:

Hamsa, 22, a Filipino worker who returned home from Syria shows her passportupon arrival at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport via a chartered flight, in southern Manila, Philippines, 11 September

 

METRO MANILA

NBI Clearance Center – U.N Avenue, Ermita. Manila
Quezon City Hall – Makatarungan St, Diliman, QC
Victory Shopping Center, Alabang, Muntinlupa City
Mandaluyong City Hall – Maysilo Circle, Mandaluyong City
Las Pinas City – Las Pinas City Hall
Robinson’s Place – Basement 1 Ermita, Manila
Robinson’s Otis – Level 2 Guanzon St., Paco, Manila
Robinson’s Galleria – Basement 1 Ortigas Ave., QC
Robinson’s Metro East – Level 4 Marcos Hi-way Pasig
Robinson’s Novaliches – Novaliches, QC
Ever Gotesco Recto – 3″‘ Flr Cinema 3 Recto Ave., Manila
Duty Free Fiesta Mall – Ninoy Aquino Ave., Paranaque City
Empire Mall – Edsa, Pasay City

CORDILLERA ADMINISTRATIVE REGION (CAR)

NBI Regional Office – Upper Session Road Baguio City

REGION I
NBI Regional Office – Aguila Road Sevilla Norte San Fernando City
Dagupan District Office – A. B. Fernandez West Dagupan City
Laoag District Office – Brgy 10 P Gomez St, Laoag City

REGION II
NBI Regional Office – Government Center Carig Sur Tuguegarao City
Bayombong District Office – Capitol Compound Bayombong Nueva Vizcaya
lsabela District Office – National Highway Brgy Osmena Ilagan Isabela

REGION III
NBI Regional Office – Capitol Compound City of San Fernando Pampanga
Bulacan District Olftce – Capitol Compound Guinhawa, City of Malolos, Bulacan
Cabanatuan Dislrict Office – Llanera St Old Provincial Capitol Cmpd Cabanaluan City
Olongapo District Office – 17 Kentucky Lane Upper Kalaklan Olongapo City
Tarlac District Office – Brgy Macabulos Drive San Roque Tarlac City
Marilao Municipal Hall – Beside PNP Station, Marilao, Bulacan

REGION IV-A
NBI Regional Office – Capitol Site Capitol Hills Batangas City
Cavite District Office – J.P. Rizal St. Kaybagal South Tagaytay City
Lucena District Office – NIA Compound Genes Aguilar St., Lucena City
Laguna District Office – Rizal Blvd Brgy. Tagapo City of Sta Rosa, Laguna
Montalban Rizal – Ground Flr., Municipal Hall
Robinson’s Cainta – Level 2 Junction Cainta, Rizal
Lipa City Hall – Lipa City, Batangas
Robinson’s Dasmarinas – Dasmarinas, Cavite

REGION IV-B
NBI Regional Office – Sitio Cuadro Aguas Brgy Sta Isabel, Calapan City
Puerto Princesa District Office – Taft St., Brgy Liwanag, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan

REGION V
NBI Regional Office – Maria Cristina St.,Naga City
Legazpi District Office – Quezon Avenue Legazpi City

REGION VI
NBI Regional Office – Duran St., Fort San Pedro Iloilo City
Bacolod District Office – Aguinaldo St. Bacolod City

REGION VII
NBI Regional Office – Escario St., Capitol Site, Cebu City
Dumaguete District Office – Capitol Area Daro Dumaguete City
Ormoc Gaisano – Gaisano Capital Mall

REGION VIII
Samar District Office – Old Health Bldg., Capitol Site Catbalogan City

REGION IX
NBI Regional Office – 19 Corcuera St. Zamboanqa City
Dipolog District Office – Quezon Ave Sta Isabel, Dipolog City
Pagadian District Office – BALGU Bldg., Capitol Compound, Pagadian City

REGION X
NBI Regional Office – Capitol Compound Cagayan de Oro City
lligan District Office – IBP Bldg., Badelles St. Pala-o lliqan City

REGION XI
NBI Regional Office – J.P. Laurel Avenue, Davao City
Tagum District Office – Door 5 Duson Apt. National Highway Visayan Village Tagum

REGION XII
NBI Regional Office – 2nd Floor South Cotabato Gymnasium Koronadal City
Saranggani District Office – San Pecto St. lagao, General Santos City

REGION XIII
NBI Regional Office – 2nd Floor FCB Bldg., J Rosales Ave Butuan City

ARMM
NBI Regional Office – Governor Gutierrez Avenue. Cotabato City

 

13th Month Pay: How is it Computed?

By Pinoy-Business.com & DOLE website

Time flies so fast and before you know it, the year-end is just around the corner. There’s the thought of Christmas and, yes, 13th-month pay, which the law requires to be paid not later than December 24 of each year.

The law – Presidential Decree No. 851 – requires all employers to pay their rank-and-file employees, regardless of the nature of their employment and irrespective of the method by which their wages are paid, an equivalent to at least one (1) month of their wages as 13th month pay. To be entitled to 13th-month pay, these employees must have worked for at least one month during the calendar year.

DOLE - 13th Month

The 13th-month pay of an employee is based on the “basic salary,” which includes all remunerations or earnings paid by an employer to an employee for services rendered. However, 13th-month pay does not include cost-of-living allowances (COLA) granted pursuant to P.D. No. 525 or Letter of Instruction No. 174, profit-sharing payments, and all allowances and monetary benefits which are not considered or integrated as part of the regular or basic salary of the employee. Maternity benefits, like other benefits granted by the SSS, are are not included in computing the employee’s 13th-month pay. Overtime pay, earnings and other remunerations are also excluded from “basic salary” in the computation of the 13th-month pay.

There’s a catch, though. If these items, which are legally excluded from the computation of 13th month pay, are included by the employer in its previous computations and such act ripens into a “company practice,” then these items can’t be excluded without violating the prohibition against diminution or elimination of  benefits.

FORMULA AND COMPUTATION OF 13TH MONTH PAY (source: DOLE website)

Total basic salary earned during the year / 12 Months = Proportionate 13th Month Pay

Illustration: Using the basic wage in the NCR at 436.00 per day and a six-day workweek or an equivalent Monthly Basic Salary of P11,372.33, to wit:

Months Attendance Salary in a Month
January no absence P11,372.33
February no absence P11,372.33
March 1 day leave w/ pay P11,372.33
April no absence P11,372.33
May 2 days leave w/ pay P11,372.33
June 2 days leave w/ pay P11,372.33
July no absence P11,372.33
August 2 days leave w/ pay P11,372.33
September on maternity leave no salary
October on maternity leave no salary
November no absence P11,372.33
December 5 days leave w/o pay 9,192.33
P111,543.33 / 12 months P9,295.28 is the proportionate 13th month pay

Note:
1. COLA of P30.00 under Wage Order No. NCR 17 is not included in the basic salary in computing 13th month pay.

2. The 2 months of maternity leave are not included in the computation of 13th month pay because the female employee has no earnings from the company for the period.